SRAM eTap BlipGrip

Made exclusively for aero bar extensions and base bars, BlipGrips™ give you a secure mount for your SRAM eTap® Blips™. BlipGrips™ slide over the end of your aero extensions and are secured with a 2.5mm screw.

  • 360 degree rotation for adjustment
  • Aero use only to fit 22.2mm OD bar 65mm in length
  • Fits all Zipp aero extensions and base bars
  • Blips not included

 

For more information and compatibility statement please check out our FAQ page and register for updates.

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MSRP*
USD: $20
Euro: €20
Euro MSRP includes VAT

*Maximum Suggested Retail Price

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Specs

Specifications for SRAM eTap BlipGrip

Weight57g for pair (does not include Blip)
MaterialPolypropylene + TPE
Compatibility11-speed
Recommended GroupSRAM RED eTap

Technology

eTAP

All of the underlying tech in our new SRAM RED® eTap groupset such as wireless shifting, advanced battery power management and mechatronics technologies are all meant to serve one ultimate purpose, to facilitate the most intuitive and consistent shifting available. This shift logic is called eTap. Right lever makes it harder, left lever makes it easier, both levers shift the front derailleur. Simple, unmistakable, and intuitive.

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Service

Documents Available for SRAM eTap BlipGrip

See more documents available for SRAM Road products.


SRAM Warranty (2.19 MB, PDF) - 28 Pages

Languages covered: EN, DE, ES, FR, IT, NL, PT, JA, ZH, PL, DA, CS, EL, RO, FI, SV, GA, BG, MT, SK, SL, HU, ET, LV, LT, KO, RU
Updated June 16, 2015

Video


Reviews

Industry Reviews

Reviews
SRAM's Wireless Shifting Will Revolutionize Your Road Bike - Men's Journal

"After spending three months riding it, it’s safe to say that eTap is a truly revolutionary component group that raises the bar for what an electronic drivetrain can be. And it may even redefine the way we shift our bikes."

by Whit Yost, Men's Journal, July 1, 2016
Bike Company Switches Gears in Road Shifting, Going Wireless | The New York Times

"But SRAM’s new offering, Red eTap, effectively turns bikes into micronetworks that allow shifting that is both wireless and electronic."

 

"Despite wireless advances since then, SRAM quickly discovered that off-the-shelf wireless systems were not up to the job. With Bluetooth, for example, there was too great a time lag. Other systems strained batteries. As a result, SRAM was left to come up with a wireless system of its own."

by Ian Austen, nytimes.com, July 11, 2016